Church

The Church was central to life in Britain at the start of World War 1. Between 25-29 per cent of people attended every single Sunday. But there was also a vast latent involvement in the Church: weddings, funerals, baptisms, harvest festival and other key dates in the Christian calendar.

Having an understanding of the Bible – which came through attending Sunday School – was key to being seen as a respectable, well-educated person. So it is perhaps no wonder that 90 per cent of children attended Bible classes. 

‘Greater love hath no man than this’

‘Greater love hath no man than this’

As churches up and down the country mark Remembrance Sunday, many will gather at war memorials as they have done for nearly 100 years.

Grief and comfort: one war memorial’s story

Grief and comfort: one war memorial’s story

Of the 200 men from Ledbury, in Herefordshire, who fought in World War One, 85 did not return.

The bell ringer who died at the Somme

The bell ringer who died at the Somme

David Evan-Owens’s life revolved around church. He was a stonemason, working at local churches and chapels in Herefordshire. In the evenings, his hobby was bell ringing at Ledbury Parish Church.

Why one elderly man left home and family to care for British troops

Why one elderly man left home and family to care for British troops

When World War 1 broke out, my own great-grandfather Thomas Winter knew he had to be there, writes Hazel Southam.

Bringing the Bible to life

Bible Society, Stonehill Green, Westlea, Swindon, SN5 7DG. Registered charity 232759